What to do When Your Pet Dies Unexpectedly

Unlike most stories, the beginning chapters of Lady’s remain a mystery. She was picked up as a stray wandering the streets and brought to the Great Plains SPCA in Independence where she would be a long-term resident before joining my family in the Spring of 2017. That is where the final chapter of her tale begins…

what to do when your pet dies unexpectedly

Lady: The Final Chapter

It was Mother’s Day when Charlotte (my six year old daughter) and I took a trip to the local animal shelter. We had already discussed the possibility of adopting another dog when the ‘right one’ came along but weren’t in any rush to bring another creature into our pack. We’d been to a few other places and hadn’t quite found the right fit for our family- until that day.

Lady was coming in from a walk with one of the volunteers when we met her. As she hobbled along the path back up to her space, I knew she was special. There was a sweetness about her, a kindness in her eyes, that instantly drew us to her.

what to do when your pet dies unexpectedly

As an elderly dog, I wasn’t prepared to bring her into my home knowing that we may only have a couple of years together but the instant connection made all of the hesitation I had before hand go away. Lady deserved a home and we were going to be the ones to give it to her. After a few more visits and a meet-and-greet with Winnie, our 11-year old dog, we welcomed Lady into the family on May 17th, 2017.

What to do when your pet dies unexpectedly

Given Lady’s condition (she had trouble walking and we were told she had bad arthritis), we knew that the transition into a new household would take some time but hope is a seemingly magical thing that made Lady’s transition so much smoother than we could have ever anticipated.

The day we adopted Lady, her movement was limited and navigating stairs seemed like an impossible task. So I spent time each day carrying her up and down the stairs into our back yard so that she could relieve herself and enjoy time in the sun with Winnie. I had come to terms with the fact that Lady was going to need extra care – and was prepared to give it to her – but she surprised me.

Within just a couple of weeks, this dog that was barely able to walk when we first met her was running (literally – running) around the backyard and able to get up and down the stairs into the house on her own. I truly believe that Lady just needed the hope, love, and encouragement that only life with a family can bring a dog. Lady had found her forever home, we had found a piece of our lives that we didn’t even know was missing – and summertime was wonderful.

what to do when your pet dies unexpectedly

Summertime brought the freedom for my dogs to explore the outside and to relax together on the lawn. Together, they spent a few hours a day taking in the fresh air but it never failed that, when I opened the door and called them in, they would both come running as fast as they could to come see me. Lady hadn’t just become a member of our pack that we cared for, she had also become my friend.

I found myself looking forward to my favorite parts of the day, when I saw my dogs running up towards the house – something I never envisioned being possible when we’d first met. Little did the dogs know that I loved those moments just as much as they did – because they were full of joy.

what to do when your pet dies unexpectedly

Over the span of just a few months, Lady had become an important part of our pack. She was family, and she was loved. Fast forward to the night of October 21st, 2017. It started raining so I rushed to the backdoor to call the dogs in – expecting to see them both hop up and run in, excited to come inside. Except that didn’t happen.

Lady got up, like she usually did, and started to come towards me before collapsing on the lawn. I ran down the stairs to the yard and helped Lady get back to her feet. As we tried to get up the stairs, Lady collapsed again and that’s when it hit me – Lady was going to die.

I honestly can’t tell you how I knew but I could sense it and I knew what to do. My job was to make sure that this dog, my friend, was comfortable and loved in her final moments. The progression of Lady’s death happened so quickly there wasn’t time to think about much else than keeping her comfortable. By the time we got inside, her back legs had stopped working all together and her body was shutting down.

I brought her inside my bedroom and we said our goodbyes. As I petted her and talked to her about how wonderful she was, Lady kept trying to inch closer and closer to me – all she wanted was to be loved. I finally ended up moving her on top of me as I laid myself down on my back on the floor. Nothing prepares you for having a creature that you love die in your arms. It’s one of the most difficult things I have ever experienced but, at the same time, it’s exactly as it was supposed to be.

Lady passed away in the comfort of my arms, surrounded by the love that she had gotten to experience in her final months on Earth and I am grateful that we were able to be part of that journey for her, no matter how difficult it may have been to lose her.

I don’t know how her story started, or what adventures the early chapters brought but I know that her final chapter was beautiful and I’ll never forget her presence in our lives.

The aftermath of losing Lady was challenging because it’s something that I had never been through before, but the experience is something I want to make sure that I share with you in the event that you find yourself in a similar situation down the road.

What to do When Your Pet Dies Unexpectedly

After Lady passed away, I knew we needed to do something with her body and have a plan of action in place. Given the fact that it was late at night and on a weekend, I wasn’t quite sure how to handle it. When your pet dies unexpectedly, like ours did, here’s what you need to do:

-Wrap your pet up in a blanket, towel, or something similar

-If you have access to plastic to wrap around the bottom half of your pet, do it. They will sometimes release some of their bodily fluids after passing away.

-Place your pet in a box or container to transport them.

-Know your options. We utilized Pet Cremation Services, out of Martin City, and they were wonderful to work with. We called them on Sunday morning and brought Lady to their facility on Sunday afternoon.

Pet Cremation Services offers several options for families from group cremation, where they spread the ashes in their memorial garden, to options where you can keep your pet’s ashes after their gone. You can find details about all that they offer online here. They were amazing, gentle, and kind and I cannot even begin to tell you how comforting that was in the aftermath of Lady’s passing.

My biggest piece of advice is to understand WHAT to do if this ever happens to you. It’s hard enough losing a beloved pet unexpectedly and knowing what your next steps are will make it easier for you in the long run. If I could go back in time, knowing what I know now, and decide whether or not to welcome Lady into our family, would I?! Absolutely.

Lady’s presence in our lives wasn’t just a gift to her, it was a gift to my family as well. She was a gentle, sweet, kind soul that I am lucky to have known. Not only was she our family pet, but Lady was also our friend and we miss her every day. When you have the chance to love others, both people and pets, do it. You’ll never regret spreading kindness and love.

From my family to yours,

Holli

My Experience As A KC Pet Project Volunteer

Bridgette and her family’s search for a pet of their own led them to volunteering with the KC Pet Project.  Here, Bridgette tells us all about their experience!

My KC Pet Project Experience

Over the past several months, it seems like the only thing my family talks about is puppies or getting a pet.  So, it wasn’t a shock to me when my husband agreed that we would start looking for a dog that we can welcome into our family! I knew that having a pet was sort of a rite of passage for a child so this was something that I have been preparing myself to deal with.

When we first got married, my husband and I had a young dog and a puppy, and they were amazing, but we had to give them away when we moved to a new state. But as I got older and had kids, a dog seemed to drop lower and lower on my list of wants and needs. It just didn’t seem that important anymore.

Well, last weekend, we decided to start our search for a family dog and after a lot of talking and research, we found out that my husband and I could volunteer at the pound (KCPP) and even bring our children along too. This would give us and our kids time to practice walking the dogs and really just being around them so they could start to feel at ease. But when we walked in the KC Pet Project, my whole entire outlook changed. We NEEDED a dog! Not just for my kids’ sake or my husbands, but for theirs as well.

As we walked through the aisles of a wide variety of dogs, my heart was of two minds. It started to ache because there were so many abandoned, abused and lost dogs. It also started to fill with joy when I saw how anxious they were to interact with us. I wanted to take all of them right then and there! Fighting back the tears of overwhelming emotions, I knew that this was something we had to do!

The KC Pet Project is an amazing organization. They are a no kill organization and they are paving the way in Kansas City to create a No- Kill Kansas City. They are striving to care for all healthy and treatable pets that have been abandoned, lost or abused.

Seeing all of those dogs so sad in their cages really made me think about what it would mean to adopt them. An animal is an innocent living creature and they have no control where they end up or how they get treated, so adopting one and saving its life is now one of the most important things my family could do. Showing concern, compassion and genuine love for these amazing animals is sure to have a major positive impact on all our lives!

While we continue our search for the right pet and begin to make room, we will proudly be volunteering to help make these animals feel the love and comfort they need and deserve.

If you are looking for a pet, I strongly urge you to check out https://kcpetproject.org/ for more information as well as www.KCPets.com for resources on adoption and other valuable information.

What to Do When the Puppy Comes Home

We have a great post for you today from our guest poster, Sarah. Sometimes, the best way to prepare for a puppy is to get advice from those that have done it before you. Sarah shares her experience in bringing home a puppy to her family and has a few tidbits to hopefully help you!

 

What to Do When the Puppy Comes Home!

What to Do When the Puppy Comes Home

Our silver lab, Ammo, is now 6 months old. When we brought him home my girls were instantly in love. They had wanted a puppy for a long time and when my husband and I decided to get one, it all seemed to move quickly. I did preparation around the house but the big things; I couldn’t do because we were keeping this a secret from the girls. So my normal planning of talking to my girls about responsibility of having a pet and how we treat our pet happened very shortly after the euphoria of getting him and bringing him home. First thing my kids want to do is hold him and love on him; first thing Ammo wanted to do was run away!

As they are cornering him in the kitchen, I hear the familiar scream of pain from my youngest. Yep! Those puppy teeth chomped down a little too hard. Poor little girl didn’t know why her puppy did that and little puppy didn’t know what he did. It’s hard with kids to get them to understand that this little thing is fragile—they are used to the dogs at their grandparents’ house—a big Labrador that lets them run and play and lay on him. So what did I do as the concerned I-am-going-to-use-this-as-a-teaching-moment Mom? I sat her down and explained that puppies are just playing and they only know how to play with other puppies. You know what I learned—you can’t teach anything about puppy basics to a 2 year old! It was in this moment that I knew my “Hallmark” moment of everything going perfect with new puppy was falling apart right in front of me.
Please don’t get me started on picking up the toys, we told the girls they had to keep everything picked up, that he won’t know that he can’t play with it or chew it up. I am cooking dinner one night when I hear a scream—one of those moments where you are pretty sure no one is hurt but you want to run up and give support but then again what if you really don’t want to see what happened– moments. My oldest beat me to the top of the stairs with tears in her eyes and her Tinkerbell doll—correction, I think it was her Tinkerbell doll, you see Tink was now an armless, one leg, one wing shell of herself—there is no amount of clapping that will bring her back. We had a nice service and nice words were said and then we buried her in the only fitting place—the trashcan in the garage so the carnage wouldn’t be a constant reminder. My daughter got sat down and I tried to redeem myself in a teaching moment. All I heard was that she wanted to get another dog, one that wouldn’t chew up her toys.
Potty training actually went well. We had some accidents but sooner than I expected he learned to go outside. The worst part? As he got bigger so did his well, excrement. And we now have it all over our yard! Oh and our dog does this weird walking thing while he goes so the piles are actually spread around– EVERYWHERE! I always questioned why we needed to pick up after our dog if it was in our own yard. If he goes in relatively the same spot of the yard that part, although green and lush, is always off limits. Well I get it now! I actually passed one of those signs for doggie scooping for $20 bucks a month—I wrote down the number thinking that kid is going to earn his money in our yard! We have become that house which makes you take off your shoes at the door and I have become that mom that sniffs out anything that may be on your shoes. I didn’t think anything to could make me more crazy—never question these things!
We love our Ammo. He is especially loved when my husband is traveling and the girls and I need another set of ears to vet out any unwanted intruders. He does a great job too when it is someone we know at the door; his bark lets them know there is a dog ready to protect his family in this house. The pizza delivery boy has had wide eyes a couple times when Ammo runs at the door. That is until a month or so ago. My husband was gone; it was a beautiful night so I had the window open in the bedroom. I was just getting ready to doze off when I heard the door to the bedroom rattle. Ammo perked his ears up and noticed I was sitting up in bed. I grabbed the closest thing to a weapon that I could find (the bedside lamp) and slowly walked to the door. It rattled again, Ammo stopped then ran to the closet with his tail between his legs. Don’t worry it was just the wind rattling the door, and the lamp is back where it belongs, and the dog– let’s just be glad he has a big bark!
Would I get the dog again? Of course I would! Our house feels complete and he really is a great protector of all of us. My girls still love him even with a few dismemberments of their dolls, the way I see it—survival of the fittest! Ammo sleeps with the girls. I know how gross this is with everything that he has on him, but they love it and I find that with him in there they tend to sleep better (meaning I sleep better) except when he moves off the bed to get in the bathtub where it is cool. My youngest loves to help with feeding him and my oldest is waiting when she can take him on a walk instead of the other way around. So although we hit a few snags it was worth it to remember those smiles on their faces when we first brought him in the door! Hold tight to those Hallmark moments—they make the trying times so much easier!

How to Pick the Best Food for Your Pet

Today, we have a great (sponsored) post from Shelby with Acana Pet Food. Picking the right food for your pet can be difficult, but with these tips, you’ll be able to know the best route for your pet. Check it out!

How to Pick the Best Food for Your Pet

How to Pick the Best Food for Your Pet

Pet food has really started to make an appearance on advertisements all around us. What is the best food? What do I need to avoid? Where should I purchase my pet food? Dogs are meat eaters, and we know these based on their anatomy. A dog is a descendent of the wolf and their bodies still mirror their ancestors:

– Sharp, pointy teeth – designed to tear flesh and crunch raw bone and cartilage.
– Short digestive tract – their digestive tract is designed to absorb nutrients quickly, so quality of food is important!
– No amylase – This enzyme is found in humans and other omnivores and herbivores, but not in the dog or cat. This enzyme is for pre-digesting carbohydrates. Dogs and cats do not need large amounts of carbs in their diet.

High meat content, organs, bone and cartilage along with nutritious fruits, vegetables and botanicals can all be utilized in today’s canine. These ingredients help dogs and cats live a healthy life without the worry of illnesses or conditions caused by a poor, unfit diet. Of course, there can always be underlying genetic or environmental conditions that can still cause pets to become ill even on a biologically appropriate diet. The chances of a beloved pet to become ill when fed a nutritious diet will definitely decrease, especially when starting off that puppy or kitten off on the right diet from the start.

Dogs and cats are both meat eaters and do not require carbohydrates like their human parents do. As humans, we have the characteristics of being omnivores or herbivores and we are able to digest and utilize carbohydrates for energy.

Benefits of Acana –
– All ingredients are locally sourced from family-owned farms with humane and sustainable animals.
– Frequent Buyer Program, Buy 12 Get 1 FREE – shop at your local independent retailer – ask for a Frequent Buyer Card Envelope at your local store.
– 11 different varieties for recommended rotation.
– 4 limited ingredient diets available.
– Feed less food because of denser nutrient content than most other commercial pet foods.
– Shinier coat and overall health increases.

Find your local retailer today at (Your website link) and ask which Acana formula your pet should try!

My Dog Hates Going to the Groomer: What do I do!?

Today we’ve got a guest blog post from our friend Mike over at K.I.S.S Dog Training. Mike is a leading expert in the field and offers classes and workshops for pet owners to more effectively work with their canine companions. Take a look…

Ah, the dreaded groomer. Many dogs have all sorts of anxieties when it comes to going to the vet or groomer. We’ve got some great tips for you on how to combat (or prevent) those anxieties and make visits more enjoyable for everyone. Take a look…

 

My Dog Hates Going to the Groomer: What do I do!?

My Dog Hates Going to the Groomer: What do I do!?

 

Ok, so your dog doesn’t like his or her nails trimmed, mouth touched or tail messed with He or she hates the hair dryer and could live life happily ever after for the rest of his/her life without another bath. You know it and now so does your groomer…You my friend are reading this because both your groomer and I want Fido to accept, if not like, his trips to the beauty salon. So, with a little work on your end and some patience on the part of your wonderful groomer, I bet we can improve this situation in no time at all. But where do you start? Well first thing print off this article and give a copy to your groomer. After all we want him or her on the same page, right? The Next step is up to you…

Cradle & Massage

I call it “Cradle and Massage” and it is something every dog owner should do with their pups! The earlier we start, the faster we get Fido to like his visits to the groomer (or vet for that matter). Don’t freak out if your dog is 3 or 4 years old; we can still improve the situation, making the visit safer and more pleasant for everyone involved. So, just what is “Cradle and Massage”? It is a simple but effective desensitization program for dogs of all ages in regards to the common “hot spots” most dogs just plain don’t like having messed with, the feet, mouth, tail and ears. Ironically the same spots our unfortunate groomers must touch every time.

This technique will need to be done 3-5 times a week for 10-15 minutes. I want you to get on the floor with your dog, even while watching TV, and simply cradle the dog between your legs and massage each of the above-mentioned body parts, followed by a treat after each part! The goal here is to convince Fido that touch is good (rewarding) and relaxing (kind, gentle touching).

By the time, you get this perfect, your dog should be comfortable lying on their back, being touched and will be totally relaxed. Don’t be upset if you can’t even get close to this description the first time you try this. Take it slow and progress in baby steps. Consistency and being gentle will pay off in the end!

Trainers Tip

 If your dog struggles to get away at any point during this process… Simply let the dog go and reset the process and try again. As the dog gets comfortable this will get easier, but if you hold on, trying to get the dog to submit to you… You are going to simply give Fido another reason to not enjoy or trust this kind of touch….

Take “field trips”

The other thing that needs to be done immediately is to change your dog’s view of being at the groomer (or vet). I want you to commit to taking field trips to the groomer’s or the vet’s at least once a week, (2-3 times a week starting off is even better) and just go in sit in, the lounge and give Fido some treats. Let the staff know what you are doing and ask them to give treats to your pooch as well. After 5-10 minutes or so, just get up, get in your car and go home! The reason for all this subterfuge is simple, the only time you ever take your dog to the groomer (or vet) it is an unpleasant situation (at least in the dog’s mind). By adding these short trips full of treats and rewards, your dog starts to associate the visits as being more positive and less negative.

Treats are Your Best Friend

Last thing, ask your groomer or vet to attempt to give your pooch a treat at beginning and the end of the groom or examination and report back to you whether the dog took the treat. Ironically, one of the best ways to determine a dog’s level of stress or fear (leading cause of snarkiness) is to see if they are comfortable enough to eat. This litmus test is a great way to gauge your progress, not to mention a vet or groomer that gives gifts (treats/rewards) isn’t all that scary anyways. The goal here is not to label, categorize or belittle your dog, but rather to help you his Mommy or Daddy, make his or her visit less scary and hopefully more fun!

I need to be clear though, if you do not put in the work both consistently and frequently, this problem will never get any better and your dog will continue to be fearful and dislike his visits to the groomer or vet. It is up to you, to help, Fido understand the world is a safe and accommodating, and trust me rewards are, in my opinion, the fastest way to get that point across.

Some Simple Tricks to Help Your Pets Beat the Winter Blues

As the weather warms up a little around the metro, one of our writers, Darcy, has some fantastic tips to keep your pets engaged during the crazy winter weather. Check it out!

 

Some Simple Tricks to Help Your Pets Beat the Winter Blues

After the holidays pass and temperatures get colder, many of us struggle with depression, lack of energy and boredom. The winter blues are no joke. Less time in the sun and more hours shut indoors can make all of us a little depressed. This is true for our pets as well. Perhaps it is even worse for them as they can’t ‘Netflix and chill’. Try to be patient and understand that if your pets can’t get outside to burn off some of their energy, they may get restless and into trouble.

Here’s what that looks like at my house: As I am trying to write this article, my cat, Maddie, has jumped on me repeatedly wanting to snuggle. I tell her, “No,” give her a kiss and set her on the floor to have her hop back up about three minutes later. Meanwhile, my dog, Dixie, has cried to go out and when I opened the door she sniffed the air and changed her mind. She will be back over at the door in about one minute. Kicking her out of the house doesn’t work. She cries on the other side of the door. Essentially, she is always crying on one side of the door of the other. I think she hopes at some point the door will open to Narnia or somewhere that isn’t cold and wet.

For dogs, games and toys that challenge them can be helpful. Like snack dispensing puzzle toys. You can find these on Amazon for around $10. Hide-A-Squirrel is a favorite of my dogs, while my dog-nephews (that’s a thing, right?) prefer Tug-A-Jugs.

Don’t want to buy a new thing? Try creating a little snack scavenger hunt for you pup. My kids enjoy hiding milk bones behind curtains and pillows. Just be sure to use items that won’t mold or go bad if they take a while (days/weeks) to be found.

Cats can usually be pretty easy to distract. Or mine can anyway. When I finish up here, I can snuggle her a bit and then she will be fine for a few hours. Some catnip on a scratching post or in a tiny stuffed toy can usually keep them busy until they tire out. Sometimes a new shelf by a different window in the house can help too.

When all else fails- an empty box (especially with packing paper in it) can provide hours of fun for dogs, cats and children! Hang on to those shipping boxes from the holidays!

My real challenge this year has been keeping the chickens entertained. Who knew! One things for sure, everyone at our house is eager for spring.

4 Questions to Ask Yourself Before Getting a Pet

We’re obvious pet lovers here at iPetsKC, but with all that love, also comes responsibility. Our friend Darcy gives us a few quick questions to ask yourself before getting your first (or even fifth!) pet. Take a look!

4 Questions to Ask Yourself Before Getting a Pet

4 Questions to Ask Yourself
Before Getting a Pet

 

Once your family has the idea to get a pet, it can be tempting to run out and immediately adopt one. The temptation is everywhere- KC Pet Project’s instagram has me constantly falling in love. But before you commit to your first pet, or your fifth, you need to give this some serious thought. Here are some things to consider.

#1 How much of a responsibility is it?

I’m not just talking about the initial purchase price of the pet. In fact, there are many times of year you can get a dog or cat possibly for free. You may also know someone who is trying to rehome an animal. But you have to consider the food and the care. Vet appointments, groomers, flea and heartworm medication, boarding during travel… costs can add up quickly. And of course that is assuming your pet doesn’t get injured or sick. Over the years, we have had many ill pet visits and they average to about $200 per instance. And it can get much more expensive. It was over $500 to x-ray our little dog when he had kidney stones.

#2 How much time will the pet need?

Time requirements. I always think especially of families with this one. If you are always on the run with kids’ practices and functions, you may want to rethink a pet. Dogs, especially, are highly social creatures that need your attention and time. If you like to travel or spend weekends out of town, again- a dog is probably not a good choice. Cats are a bit more independent, though they still require care. Even fish can be difficult if you are gone for multiple days. Also, you need to consider length of time you will have the pet. Many dogs and cats can live to around 20 years. There are birds and reptiles that can last 50+ years. You need to consider the longevity of the pet you want to get and ask will I still be able to care for this animal in ‘x’ years. If you don’t want that long of a commitment, consider adopting an elderly pet.

#3 What is your current living situation?

Your home. Before bringing a pet home, remember that this is a family member and will be sharing your home. If you live in a rental, save yourself the heartache of getting a pet if you aren’t allowed. And if you can’t tolerate the idea of a pet in your house for allergy reasons or otherwise- again reconsider what kind of pet will work for you. Some breeds shed, some do not. Some are hypoallergenic and some have no hair. Research your options so you know what to expect and what will work for you.

#4 How will this effect other people in your home?

Your family (fur and otherwise). When we rescued our cat this summer, we thought it would make our existing cat happy to have a playmate. This was not the case. We worked for months with the cats and our vet and have finally found a happy balance. If not all members are on board for a new addition, it may not work out.

Pro Tips

If you get through this list and you still think you’re game- feel free to do a test run! Ask to watch a friend’s pet for a few days and see how things go. (They would probably love it!) You can also sign up as a foster. It is a great way to get experience with different types and breeds of animals without the pressure of commitment. You can also volunteer at a shelter. Maybe you’ll meet your canine soul mate on a stroll.

Animals are wonderful and loving additions to any family. I think there are countless reasons they are invaluable family members. They lower stress, provide companionship and teach responsibility. But it’s up to the humans to be good family members too and that begins before you ever pick your new buddy up. If you have any questions, or think of something I missed, feel free to comment. And good luck!

4 Great Gift Ideas for the Pet Lovers in Your Life

 

4 Great Gift Ideas for the Pet Lovers in Your Life // iPetsKC Blog

4 Great Gift Ideas for the Pet Lovers in Your Life

The holidays are coming and many humans on your list may have special animals in theirs. If you are wondering what to get the pet lover in your life, don’t fret, we’ve got you covered.

#1 For the wine/cat lover

https://www.onehopewine.com/shop/pinot-for-paws-meow-gift-box/

These gift sets are too cute! In addition to this cat one, they also have two different packages for dogs (here and here). If you want something smaller, you can purchase just a bottle of Pinot Noir. One Hope partners each of their wines with different charities and a portion of those sales go to that charity. The Pinot Noir goes towards finding homes for stray animals. A win-win!

#2 For the beer/canine lover

http://www.beerpaws.com/collections/all-products

Beer Paws makes treats for dogs along with some cool merchandise. They are local and partner with various breweries to make the perfect snack for your pup. Make your own owner/pet gift and partner some treats with some local brew. My favorite combo is the Torn Label Beer Biscuits Peanut Butter Treats (Torn Label is a Kansas City brewery) and some of Torn Label’s Monk & Honey.

#3 For the rescue advocate

https://www.etsy.com/shop/GreatPlainsSPCA

The Great Plains SPCA has an etsy shop with clothing, goods and even Rotisserie coffee. I have a t-shirt from them that I just love. It is soft and has held up well. Many of their items tie into the Royals so you can have a shirt highlighting several things you love!

#4 Treats for all

Every year we pass out homemade cookies to our human neighbors and homemade dog biscuits for dog neighbors. When you get edible treats for dogs, be aware that some dogs can have food allergies just like humans can. Wheat can be a problem for many dogs so if you choose a treat with wheat- be sure to let the owner know, or avoid wheat all together. Places like Three Dog Bakery can help you choose a suitable treat, or you can make your own. Below is a recipe I found years ago somewhere and I still use. I use a bone cookie cutter, but whatever shapes you have are fine.

Darcy’s Dog Biscuits

¾ cup non-fat milk

1 egg

1 cup peanut butter (chunky or smooth)

1 cup flour (you can use brown rice flour if wheat is a concern)

1 ½ cup old fashioned oats

1 tbs baking powder

Run oatmeal in a blender to turn it into a course flour. Set aside.

Mix together the peanut butter, egg and milk. Add flour and baking to make a stiff dough. You want it to be stiff. You may need to use your hands to work the in the last of the flour and adjust the amount as needed.

Roll out on a well-floured surface until about ¼ inch thick. Cut desired shapes out with a cutter and place onto greased cookie sheet.

Bake at 375 for about 20 minutes, then flip treats and bake another 15-20 minutes.

Cool completely and store in an airtight container or Ziploc bag.

 

I hope these gifts help you find just the right thing for everyone on your list. Have a safe and Yappy Howlidays!

4 Tips to Keep Your Pets Safe this Holiday Season

Holidays can be a bundle of fun for most of us, but they can also present quite a few dangers for our furry (and perhaps, non-furry) friends. One of our great writers, Darcy, has a few tips to keep our pets safe and happy this holiday season. Check it out!

4 Tips to Keep Your Pets Safe this Holiday Season

4 Tips to Keep Your Pets Safe this
Holiday Season

 

The Holidays are here and though they can be a time of merriment and love, it can also be a dangerous time of year for your pets. Here are some tips to keep your furry loved ones safe this year.

 

Food

Food is a huge part of the holidays. Between baking gifts, hosting parties and receiving edible gifts from others- this is a yummy time of year. And all these treats can be as tempting for your pets as they are for us. Be sure you keep any harmful foods out of reach. Below is a list of foods poisonous to dogs and cats.

Signs that your pet may have eaten something they shouldn’t have include vomiting, diarrhea, excessive drinking, depression, lethargy, coordination issues, or tremors. If your pet is acting funny and you think they’ve ingested something dangerous, Blue Pearl is a 24/7 emergency vet hospital with several locations around Kansas City.

Foods not suitable for pets: Alcohol, avocado, chocolate (baking and dark chocolate are the most dangerous), caffeine, citrus, coconut, grapes and raisins, macadamia nuts, dairy, nuts, onions, garlics and chives, raw meat, raw bones or raw eggs, salt, xylitol and yeast dough.

 

Décor

Researching holiday decorations and pet safety is like a terrifying downward spiral into Murphy’s land where beautiful, sparkly and festive ornamentation became menacing monsters skulking in plain sight waiting to attack your beloved fur babies when your back is turned. I will try to give a thorough overview without you feeling like a construction paper tree taped to the wall is your only option.

 

Trees, tinsel, gift wrap, poinsettias, mistletoe, holly, and salt dough ornaments. These are the big hazards. Christmas trees- Try to keep your pets out of them. If you have a live tree, be sure to vacuum up any needles that fall so that no one eats them. Keep light cords tucked away. Tinsel- If you still use tinsel, keep it high. It is bad if ingested. This goes for that tinsel like string popular for gift wrap too.

From personal experience I can tell you, if your cat swallows some, DO NOT pull it out! It can cut and damage their throats and intestines. Cut it close to their mouth if they haven’t had much and again, call Blue Pearl. Poinsettias, mistletoe and holly are all poisonous to animals so be sure to put them where your pets cannot get to them. Finally, salt is very bad for dogs. Be sure to keep those handmade salt dough ornaments way high on the tree, or elsewhere because they can be fatal if ingested.

 

Guests

Whether you are hosting guests or you are the guest, you may want to consider boarding your pets. It is a busy time of year, and with people coming and going from your house, it can be easy for a pet to get out. Or, if your dog gets anxious with lots of people around or with a lot of noise, like mine does, sometimes it is easier on them to stay the night at a doggy hotel. If you will not be able to get home to them, due to drinking (please don’t drive) consider boarding, or asking a neighbor to check in.

 

Weather

As the temperature goes down, it gets dangerous for pets to spend too much time outside. Make sure you don’t leave your dog or their only source of water outdoors. If you don’t have a heated bowl it can freeze. Leaving your pets, even in the garage is not a good option. Please make a plan for your pets when figuring out your holiday activities.

 

Pets are a special part of the family and with a little planning they can have a happy and safe holiday season with you and the rest of your family. We at iPetsKC wish you and your pets a very happy holiday!

You Think You Want a Cat? 5 Adoption Tips To Help You Along The Way

I’ve been a pet lover my entire life. Having grown up with two cats (Snowy, a turkish-van and Smokey, a grey tabby), I found myself missing that part of my life when I moved to Kansas City several years ago. Somewhere between the start of college and the start of my family, I’d convinced myself that I wasn’t the “cat person” (I think it was right around the time that I got my dog – more on her in a later blog post) I’d once claimed to be. Like all true animal lovers, however, I couldn’t escape the call for very long and I found myself longing for that unbreakable bond between woman and cat once more.

So I started spending time at the Great Plains SPCA near my house at first with the intention of simply getting some snuggle time in and giving the cats some love and attention and after several visits I began warming up to the idea of bringing a new pet into the fold at home. My daughter, who was three at the time, was all aboard the Bring Home a New Furry Critter To Love On express and it seemed to be moving full steam ahead. Fast forward nearly three years and I couldn’t be more thrilled with the decision we made to adopt. Bringing Catniss (I did, indeed, re-name my feline family member Catniss) home was one of the best choices we’ve made and I learned a lot throughout our experience that I want to share with you today. Take a look…

Adoption Tips For Cats

Five Adoption Tips For Finding Your Next Cat

#1 Don’t Give Yourself a Deadline

Tip1DontGiveYourselfADeadline

Once we made the decision to go ahead and adopt an animal, we knew we needed to take the time to find the right cat for our family. You might be tempted to give yourself a deadline for finding the right pet for your family. Whether that’s today, next Monday, or two months from now – don’t. Adopting an animal is a lifetime commitment and your job is to make sure that your decision is the right one and that it’s mutually beneficial for both the animal as well as for your family. Giving yourself the freedom of time means that you’re more likely to find an animal that’s the ideal fit for your home.

#2 Involve The Whole Family

Adopting A Pet

It took several trips to the shelter before we connected with Catniss and it was really important to us to have the entire family involved when we ultimately made the decision to adopt her. If you’re venturing out solo on your quest for a new pet pal, be sure to ask the staff at the shelter about placing a hold on an animal that you’re interested in. That will give you the time to get your entire family together to come back for a visit before you make the choice to take your new cat or dog home forever. BC (Before Catniss), I thought I’d found a cat that would be a good fit for our family but when we brought my daughter in for a visit, we discovered that they weren’t a good fit for each other (and that’s okay).

#3 Don’t Be Afraid to Ask Questions

Adoption Tips For Cats

I am constantly amazed by the wealth of knowledge over at the SPCA. From the staff to the volunteers, they’re well trained and well equipped to answer your questions on pet care and adoption. One of the things I appreciated most was that our adoption counselor was so patient with us as we asked questions during our visit. We asked questions about her history at the shelter (where she was found, how she got along with other pets, her temperment, etc) and each question was met with a detailed answer that put us at ease as we made the decision to give Catniss a forever home.

I encourage you to do the same. Not all animals are the same and what you see on one single visit to the shelter may not necessarily be indicative that pet’s normal response. The caretakers at the shelter have, more than likely, spent time with the cat and will have a fairly good picture of what you can expect from your new pet.

#4 Go In Prepared  

iPetsKC Tips For Adoption

Once you make the decision to adopt, go ahead and prepare your house and family for the impending arrival of your new pet. Stock up on the essentials to make your new cat’s transition as smooth and streamlined as possible. The last thing you’re going to want to do is make an emergency trip to the store for supplies while your cat explores her new environment. Here’s what we had on hand for Catniss:

  • Litter box (We went ahead and set up the litter box before we ever came home so that we could immediately show Catniss her space in the house.)
  • Fresh food and water in an easily accessible place (It’s important for your new pet to associate you with comfort and safety so we made sure that we had already filled our cat’s water and food bowls before arriving home.)
  • Toys (Cats do best when they’re challenged and have the opportunity to burn off energy. Make sure you have toys on hand for your new pet’s arrival.)
  • Cat treats
  • Carrier

#5 Be Prepared For A World Of Joy

Tips For Adopting A Cat

It goes without saying that your life is going to change once you make the decision to adopt from a shelter and that was definitely true in our situation. Catniss has been an amazing addition to our family and we couldn’t be more thrilled with the decision we made to bring her into our family. Once you do the same – you’re in for a world of joy yourself and we can’t wait to hear about it.

Share your pet adoption stories with us right here on iPetsKC.com.

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